physical copies of Linux software

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stormchaser3000
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Joined: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:32 pm

physical copies of Linux software

Post by stormchaser3000 » Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:55 pm

Hello,
I was thinking that it is hard to get physical copies of software these days and just how unfortunate that is. For example, it is very hard to find a copy of LibreOffice on a DVD or a CD. there are several other examples of useful Linux software, which could have physical copies, but don't. There is also the problem of most Linux-based operating systems not having physical copies in retail stores.

The reason I find this situation unfortunate is this: not everyone has a good internet connection (if even at all). As a result, there are people who might not have the ability to just download large pieces of software such as LibreOffice or Emacs (Emacs would be a large piece of software for anyone on a dial-up connection so that is my reason for including it here). If everyone could just go to a store and buy the software and operating systems that they need then people who don't have an internet connection (or people who have a bad internet connection) could acquire the software they need.

The reason I started thinking about this is because I wanted to try living without the internet at some point just to see if I could do that and still get my work done. I realized that I would need certain software that I might not be able to get without an internet connection such as LibreOffice or Eclipse. it was then that I started searching for physical copies of LibreOffice and other physical copies of open source Linux-compatible software. My efforts yielded nothing.

It should not be hard to put an AppImage and a copy of the source code for the software on the AppImage on a DVD. That just makes it all the more sad that we don't have physical copies of most open source and free software.

Of course it would be possible for someone to ask a friend who has access to an internet connection to put an AppImage of the requested software (as well as the source code) on a flash drive or DVD, but what if a person doesn't have any friends who have an internet connection? What if they live in a country where the internet doesn't really exist yet?

It is for these reasons that I wish more projects would create physical media for their software. At the very least they could partner with a company to produce such media.

What do you think?

should most major open source software projects partner with companies to provide retail copies of operating systems and software? Is there another option? Or is this just a bad idea?

I would love to hear everyone's thoughts on the matter

EDIT: I am sure that not every project has the sources to do this, however, at the very least, the major open source projects with lots of resources behind them could probably do this.

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fossegrim
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Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2020 8:49 pm

Re: physical copies of Linux software

Post by fossegrim » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:10 am

The reason I started thinking about this is because I wanted to try living without the internet at some point just to see if I could do that and still get my work done. I realized that I would need certain software that I might not be able to get without an internet connection such as LibreOffice or Eclipse. it was then that I started searching for physical copies of LibreOffice and other physical copies of open source Linux-compatible software. My efforts yielded nothing.
In which case your efforts can't have been very extensive. Googling for LibreOffice dvds gave me loads of results.There are many retailers who sell copies of free software on dvds, especially to third world countries where they don't have internet.
should most major open source software projects partner with companies to provide retail copies of operating systems and software? Is there another option? Or is this just a bad idea?
Because of the nature of free and open source software "companies" do not need to partner with the open source projects to sell physical copies of the software. As long as you abide by the appropriate license you are free to sell the software to whomever you want. There is no need to ask anyones permission. I do however doubt that there is a large market, especially in developed countries for this.
“Software is a gas; it expands to fill its container.”
— Nathan Myhrvold

Website: http://fossegr.im/
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bigpod
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Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:51 pm

Re: physical copies of Linux software

Post by bigpod » Tue Jan 21, 2020 4:38 am

Phisical copies are useless in this day and age for most of the developed world specialy if they are on optical media which in my opinion should go to landfills of history
Use whatever tool makes your job easier.

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fossegrim
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Re: physical copies of Linux software

Post by fossegrim » Tue Jan 21, 2020 6:34 am

bigpod wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 4:38 am
Phisical copies are useless in this day and age for most of the developed world specialy if they are on optical media which in my opinion should go to landfills of history
What makes you answer this? He didn't ask if they where usefull plus he clearly specified his use case. This brings nothing meaningful to the discussion.
“Software is a gas; it expands to fill its container.”
— Nathan Myhrvold

Website: http://fossegr.im/
Shithub: https://github.com/olav35
Tweeter: https://twitter.com/olebullsplass

bigpod
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:51 pm

Re: physical copies of Linux software

Post by bigpod » Tue Jan 21, 2020 10:49 am

fossegrim wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 6:34 am
bigpod wrote:
Tue Jan 21, 2020 4:38 am
Phisical copies are useless in this day and age for most of the developed world specialy if they are on optical media which in my opinion should go to landfills of history
What makes you answer this? He didn't ask if they where usefull plus he clearly specified his use case. This brings nothing meaningful to the discussion.
testing and/or missuse of resources arent realy in my opinion good reasons but alas i should dismiss someone like that

I miss spoke phisical copies arent useless by themself their are useless by proxy being mostly done on a medium that should not exist anymore if we find a cheap medium that would be more usefull and less wastfull sure.

And o yea another reason they are done on a medium that is quite bad for our nature since it is normaly single use and azlt the end lands ona landfill
Use whatever tool makes your job easier.

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